Gustave Stickley: At Home in Syracuse with Beth Crawford

Project Manager Beth Crawford will spoke on the rescue and restoration of his Columbus Avenue residence in “Gustav Stickley: At Home in Syracuse” at the Strathmore Speaker Series on Thursday, September 28th, 2017. A full video recording of this event is available on the Series’ Facebook page here.

About Beth Crawford

Beth is a Senior Associate with Crawford & Stearns, Architects and Preservation Planners, PLLC of Syracuse and has been a Designer and Project Manager with the firm since 1983. She has participated in the preservation, rehabilitation, and adaptive use of hundreds of buildings across New York State. Beth has participated as a team member on numerous historic building condition assessments and historic structure reports including for the Michigan Avenue Baptist Church in Buffalo. Most recently she has coordinated the rehabilitation of the Babcock Shattuck House, a condominium rehabilitation of a Queen Anne house on East Genesee Street, and the fire restoration at Grace Episcopal Church on Madison Street.  Beth is currently Project Manager for the restoration of the Gustav Stickley House on Columbus Avenue in Syracuse.

About the Gustav Stickley House

The Gustav Stickley House, located at 438 Columbus Avenue in Syracuse, was home to the famed Arts and Crafts style furniture maker from 1901-1905 and again from 1915 to 1942. Built in 1900 in the Queen Anne style, a fire gutted the home on Christmas Eve 1901 presenting Stickley with the opportunity to rebuild the entire interior. Following extensive renovations it would became what is believe to be the first Arts and Crafts style home in America.

The home has had several owners since the Stickley family, and was eventually purchased in 1995 by the Audi family, which had acquired L. and J.G. Stickley Co., the furniture company setup by Gustav’s younger brothers Leopold and John George, in 1974.

After sitting vacant for twenty years, the phase one of the home’s restoration kicked off this past August. Expected to cost between $2.3 and $2.5 million, the project was originally overseen by the Everson Museum of Art, but has since been handed over to the Onondaga Historical Association. It is expected to take at least three years to complete at which time it will become a major landmark for the Arts and Crafts movement in America.